'Nod Your Frickin' Head"

Why Head/Neck Nods?



Busta Rhymes told me to do so way back in 2001!


Very few areas of the body elicit a stronger fear response than the neck or specifically movement of the neck. At GYBTH, we advocate moving the neck into extension, not hyperextension, but simply extension. Some medical publications decry this practice. Why do we applaud and advocate it: Quite simply because the ability to control your head is the ability to control YOUR BODY! Where your head goes, your body follows. This is a basic primordial reflex that is involuntary in nature. Our conscious brain has no control of this phenomenon.


So if your posture is compromised, and most humans suffer this problem, then the inability to control your head affects the way the rest of your body biomechanically operates.


Are you periodically feeling tight or sore through your connective tissue, muscles or joints? Is your movement or are your movement patterns compromised or dysfunctional? Look no further than your neck, or lack of head control. Consider this: as a baby, the first area of your body you had to control was your head and neck. That was roughly ⅓ of your bodyweight at the time, more or less. By laying on our belts and backs, lifting our heads and moving our necks in all directions, we learned about the world around us and indirectly began the cultivation of our reflexive stability, strength, and posture.


We also sharpened our vestibular or balance system. The vestibular system is our righting system and when dull or down-regulated, makes simple tasks like staying upright challenging.


The vestibular system is located in our head more specifically in our ears. It the first sensory system in the human body to develop in utero, around 21 days after conception and is fully developed around 5 months after conception. Every other sensory system in our bodies is routed through the vestibular system. In addition, every single muscle in our bodies (ALL 6401) are tied to the vestibular system The muscles of the head and neck are not excluded from this. And because the body and connective tissue is a 3-dimensional matrix of fibers connecting us from head to toe, the muscles of the neck and core (front and back sides of the trunk) are inextricably tied to one another. So moving your head sensitizes your vestibular system, stimulates core and trunk musculature, and consequently makes your body more stable, strong and resilient.


What is that the best way? There is no definitive best way. We at GYBTH like to think this is a good start!

In summation, Neck Nods:  IMPROVE POSTURE! This improved posture reduces the amount of shearing and compression force on the cervical spine. This reduces the amount of pressure on the cervical nerves as they exit the spinal column, allowing them to function properly (i.e. allow for proper signaling to the upper body appendages). Head Nods also “floss” the cervical nerves, innervating and upregulating the input and communication from the brain to the muscles in the shoulders, arms, and hands By releasing these entrapped nerves it’s possible for us to see increased ranges of motion the shoulders and hips! Why? Again, because where the head goes, the body follows. Reclaim control of the head and you reclaim control of your body.


So listen to Busta Rhymes, and “Nod Your Fricken Head!”.



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